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Reviews: The Next Girl & Other Lesbian Tales

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Available at Amazon | Kobo

The Next Girl & Other Lesbian Tales

From Omnivore Bibliosaur:

Sexy, suspenseful, and full of surprises, The Next Girl & Other Lesbian Tales features an array of previously published short stories starring women of color. Tawanna Sullivan serves up a sampler platter of genres: erotica, horror, suspense, thriller, fantasy, and romance. This slender volume is the perfect companion for any spare moment or a leisurely morning.

-read the full review

From Black Lesbian Literary Collective

Overall, I enjoyed this collection, and would definitely recommend it for anyone looking for a short, fun, Black lesbian read. Sullivan is good, and while the erotica is probably her best work, I’d love to see her do more with speculative fiction and horror.

-read the full review

It’s here! The Next Girl & Other Lesbian Tales (ebook)

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The Next Girl & Other Lesbian Tales is now available via Amazon and Kobo.
The Next Girl & Other Lesbian Tales

The Introduction:

A collection of previously published stories, The Next Girl & Other Lesbian Tales is an eclectic mix of black lesbian fiction. These are stories of love, lust, desire, mystery, and revenge—with a touch of humor here and there.

There are two stories of “pure” erotica; sex is the engine driving the plot. In The Souvenir, a woman riding the subway gets a front row seat to a live sex show. In Just Desserts, the erotic potential of chance comes into play when a couple is stranded at an airport.

Several tales delve into the up-and-down nature of relationships. When Narcia loses her lust interest to her best friend in The Next Girl, long held resentments rise to the surface. After a disastrous day, lovers in The Getaway take an impromptu trip and reaffirm their commitment to each other.

In Losing Michelle, a horror writer wishes her partner would leave her alone—until the woman goes missing. Originally published under the pseudonym Evelyn Foster, In Remembrance of Her finds a woman negotiating with dark forces in a quest to save her lover. Despite rumors, Chante is drawn to the mysterious Diana in The One Who Got Away.

Themes of community and forgiveness are also explored. In Operation Butch Ambush, rival factions come together to save women from a nefarious group that reprograms butch lesbians who have strayed from strict gender roles. Aria comes home from a hellish week at work to a nasty surprise in Cat and Mouse. In The Homecoming, it’s a funeral that prompts Melanie to revisit the past and her fractured relationship with her family.

Also included are flash fiction pieces with bite. Famished and Witness are about different forms of hunger.

Spanning a decade, these pieces reflect the political and social realities of their times. For example, before same sex marriage or civil unions, a lesbian couple who wanted their union recognized in some legal capacity could get into a domestic partnership (if their municipality offered it).

I enjoyed writing these stories; I hope you enjoy reading them.

Pat Greene: Her Story (Book Review)

Pat Greene: Her Story by Anondra Kat WilliamsIn Pat Greene: Her Story by Anondra Williams, an elderly Pat looks back over her life and shares stories of love, loss, heartbreak and laughter.

A black lesbian in 1950’s rural Mississippi, Pat was kicked out of the house at 17 because her mamma disapproved of her nasty ways. She started out as a naive country girl trying to survive on her own. She searched for community, a family and a girlfriend. Pat talks about everything.

From the cramped house parties where you had to know somebody who knew somebody to get in–to being in relationships long after they’ve soured. Sometimes, Pat didn’t feel safe anywhere–not at home, not at work, not in her own skin. (If you are a black and/or lgbtq reader, it won’t be lost on you how some of those struggles are still present–marriage equality aside.)

Pat has a down-home, tell it like it is kind of voice. Her stories are peppered with side-tales and funny observations about life. If you are looking for a voice and perspective usually missing from lgbtq literature, you should check it out.

You can hear this review on Anchor.

Support LGBT Small Presses

Went to the Rainbow Book Fair in NYC yesterday. Had a great time perusing the tables–since gay and lesbian bookstores in the my area have gone extinct–it was a nice opportunity to check out what’s new with lgbt small/independent presses. There were a few tables featuring big, tom-of-finlandesque men but there were a wide variety of publishers present including Redbone Press, Vintage Entity Press, and The Feminist Press. (See the Full list here.)

Lisa C. Moore from Redbone Press was on a panel called How to Run a Small Press Without Going (Completely) Bankrupt; it was eye opening. Discounts from online retailers may seem like a great deal at the moment but it’s not that retailer who takes a cut in profits. Add disappearing distributors and vanishing bookstores to the mix…small presses work extremely hard to get to produce books/media for communities that big publishers often don’t give a second thought to. T’is better to buy directly from a small press, pay full retail price+shipping, and–hopefully–be rewarded with more fantastic books in the future.

So, sometime this summer, I’ll get rid of the Kuma2.net Amazon affiliate store and redirect people interested in a specific title to the website of the publisher itself.

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